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End Of Life notification of Identive Flash Readers -- 28 Nov 2012

As part of our on-going product lifecycle management process, we herewith announce End-of-Life status for the following flash based smart card readers.

Products targeted for end-of-life will be available for a last time buy purchase period prior to finally being made obsolete.

Under the terms of the last time buy program, orders with a fixed delivery date will be accepted until the above mentioned Last Time Buy Date. After this Last Time Buy date no further orders for this product can be accepted any more.

Scheduled deliveries will be permitted until the last Time Delivery Date. Thereafter, this product will be considered obsolete and no additional deliveries can be made.

Acceptance of last time buy orders is subject to product availability and at the discretion of Identive. Every effort will be made to fulfill these orders. Purchase orders for these products will be considered non-cancelable, non-returnable and non-re-schedulable.

We realize that a product discontinuation may cause some inconvenience to our customers. In order to make the product transition to the replacement device as smoothly as possible, our sales and technical support teams are ready to help and to answer any questions in relation to our products and solutions.

In the case of questions concerning this End Of Life notification we appreciate an early communication.

Identive Infrastructure Reader Product Transition Table

                 




Cheetah Pro Controller is End Of Life! -- 24 Jul 2012

We hereby inform you that the Cheetah Pro controller, which was built in the ATA memory cards, is End of Life.
The successor is Tiger controller and is now built into the cards.
...

                 




SCM PC-Card now on Facebook -- 05 Jul 2012

Become a fan on our Facebook page...

                 




Fehlerhafte eGK -- 24 Oct 2011

only available in German

                 




Einbindung von eHealth Terminals in die Praxissoftware -- 28 Apr 2011

only available in German

                 




NFC-Smart-Poster-Sticker for Google Hotspot-Service -- 12 Apr 2011

Atlanta and Santa Ana, April 12, 2011
ACiG Technology, a supplier and distributor of RFID products and a business unit of Identive Group, Inc. announced that is has been selected as the exclusive supplier of near field communication (NFC) RFID stickers for the roll out of Google´s marketing...

                 




eHealth: high demand lead to shortage -- 17 Mar 2011

only available in German...

                 




nPA -- 02 Mar 2011

only available in German

                 




New nPA & Cebit -- 02 Mar 2011

only available in German

                 




eHealth200 BCS qualified for digital signature -- 24 Feb 2011

only available in German...

                 




eHealth200 BCS & SafeNet -- 24 Feb 2011

only available in German

                 




ConCERTO for Converged Logical and Physical Access -- 08 Dec 2010

SCM Microsystems, a business unit of Identive Group, Inc. introduced ConCERTO, an innovative solution that allows the rapid and cost-effective addition of logical access security to existing physical access systems.

The new solution combines SCMs new ConCERTO LOGON Manager, the Compa...

                 




AusweisApp -- 08 Dec 2010

only available in German

                 




eHealth 200 & 500 -- 29 Nov 2010

only available in German

                 




KBV and Health Insurance define allowance -- 14 Nov 2010

only available in German

                 




Goverment pressure on health insurance companies. -- 08 Nov 2010

only available in German

                 




Sicherheits-Plattform GeNUBox -- 05 Nov 2010

only available in German

                 




SCL011 & SDI011 -- 05 Nov 2010

only available in German

                 




free IT security kit via Cosmos Direkt -- 05 Nov 2010

only available in German...

                 




IT Security Kit -- 05 Nov 2010

only available in German

                 




Portfolio enhancement through acquisition -- 01 Nov 2010

Singapur, 1. November 2010 - Identive
Group, Inc. today announced that it has entered into an agreement with the France-based Group FCI SA to acquire FCI´s Smartag subsidiary, a Singapore-based manufacturer of RFID inlays and inlay applications, as well as an associated portfolio of RFID an...

                 




eGK Roll-out restarts 2011 -- 31 Oct 2010

only available in German

                 




SCR3310v2 reader/writers are being used by China Unicom -- 28 Oct 2010

ISMANING, Germany, October 28, 2010 SCM Microsystems, a leading provider of solutions for secure access, secure identity and secure exchange and a business unit of Identive Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: INVE, FSE: INV), announced that it has been selected to provide SCR3310v2 high-speed card reader/writers ...

                 




IT-Security kit -- 04 Oct 2010

only available in German

                 




Knowledge or Safety issues? -- 26 Aug 2010

Multi-protocol contactless reader for eID


Dietmar Wendling, Vice President Market Sector e-Government, SCM Microsystems, comment on public reviews:
...

                 




Custom Write Technology offered by Sandisk,
implemented by SCM
-- 11 Jul 2010

SanDisk WORM Cards enable unalterable data storage of digital information and
are designed for applications where data reliability and safety are paramount. With 100
year data retention¹ capability, these cards ensure the longevity, as well as the integrity,
of data stored.

                 




Identive Group:
Multicard wins project for new electronic ID card (nPA)
-- 21 Jun 2010

06/18/2010
Identive Group, a leading provider of products, services and solutions for the security, identification and RFID industries, today announced that Multicard GmbH, a part of the group, wins project at "Bundesministerium des Inneren" for the new electronic ID card.

The ...

                 




Siemens qualify SCM PC-Card Reader -- 09 Nov 2009


More information

                 




NeoPhotonics widely tunable NTL2040 -- 21 Jul 2008

NeoPhotonics widely tunable NTL2040 high power tunable laser for DWDM networks has
an output power of 40 mW and other features ideal for DQPSK coding, 40 Gbps and 100 Gbps systems.



NeoPhotonics NTL2040 tunable laser comes in an ITLA form factor and with one part number
can address all commonly used wavelengths in DWDM systems in the C, C+, L and XL bands,
with channel spacing based on the â€ÜITU-Tâ€? specified 50 GHz grid.

ECOC 2008, Brussels
Opening Times
Monday 22nd September 2008
09:30 - 18:00
Tuesday 23rd September 2008
09:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 24th September
09:30 - 16:00

Stand #30

                 




New highspeed FlashCard Reader -- 22 Mai 2008

The ICS-237C rev.2 is a external 5-slot highspeed FlashCard Reader
for different memory cards.

Detailed information about this product

                 




Getting Fiber to Homes Faster -- 31 Jan 2008

Circuits that integrate electronic and optical components might help spread the fiber revolution.

By Kate Greene

A new circuit that combines electrical and optical components could speed the deployment of fiber-optic
networks to homes, which would usher in a host of new services, including Internet-protocol television.
The technology is currently being developed by a handful of companies in both the United States
and Japan.

Today, fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) is available in only about 15 U.S. cities, as well as some urban areas
in Japan, Korea, and China, in part because it takes a huge investment of time and money to build
all the infrastructure: to dig new trenches, to lay new fiber, and to install the fiber utility box on homes.

But there's another hold up: it's expensive to manufacture and deploy all the individual optic-fiber
devices, called "triplexers," that must be affixed to houses. These triplexers, which come into play
where the fiber connects to the home, contain the electrical and optical components that guide
and collect the data-carrying photons that become Web pages, telephone calls, or video.

While new technology may do little to solve the problem of ditch-digging, it could make it much
cheaper to produce triplexers, by integrating multiple functions onto a single chip.
This technology, called a planar lightwave circuit (PLC), is already used in some fiber network
applications. But there it integrates only optical components -- for applications such as triplexers,
the chip needs to incorporate both electrical and optical components.

The optical structures in a triplexer, the waveguides and filters, direct the incoming information
and split the photons delivered through the fiber-optic pipes into two wavelengths (1,550 nanometers
carries analog information such as video and 1,490 nanometers carries data such as Internet and voice).
Meanwhile, one type of electrical component, small detectors, collects the photons coming into
the home, while the another, lasers, produce light (at 1,310 nanometers) that sends information
away from the home (say, an e-mail or phone call).

Today's triplexers are made in two separate steps: optical waveguides are deposited on a chip,
and then separately housed lasers and detectors must be carefully aligned and attached to the
waveguides. Since much of the alignment must be done manually, manufacturing
is costly and time-consuming, says Mario Dagenais, professor of electrical and computer engineering
at the University of Maryland. The new triplexer PLC technology is able to integrate optical and
electrical components onto a single chip, Dagenais says, by borrowing well-honed processes from
semiconductor chip manufacturing.

Although it's still in the testing phase, this kind of device could ultimately drive down the price
of producing fiber-optic connections to homes and buildings, says Ferris Lipscomb, vice president
of marketing at NeoPhotonics, a San Jose-based optical components manufacturer.

NeoPhotonics has developed one PLC triplexer. In their process, glass waveguides and filters
are deposited onto a six-inch silicon wafer, and then semiconductor lasers and detectors are bonded
onto the substrate in an automated process. Currently, PLC triplexers from NeoPhotonics are being
field-tested by large telecommunication companies. NeoPhotonics expects them to be deployed in
FTTH networks within a year.

Despite its promise, though, PLC triplexers are not yet the most cost-effective solution to getting
fiber optics into the home, says Fred Leonberger, senior advisor at MIT's Center for Integrated
Photonic Systems, simply because the market isn't big enough yet to justify the cost of developing
the technology. Instead, the current solution of separately assembling triplexers is economical
for the number of current consumers. "For that volume, it's the cheapest solution," he says.

As of February 2006, 3.6 million homes in the United States had the capability for a direct fiber
connection, yet there were only about 548,000 subscribers, according to the Fiber-to-the-Home
Council and Telecommunications Industry Association.

Still, points out Dagenais, Verizon began rolling out its FTTH program in the United States a couple
of years ago (see "To Fight, Verizon Switches"), and has continued its commitment to bringing
fiber to homes. The demand, he says, will drive the need for more FTTH devices such as triplexers,
and this is where PLC technology will thrive. "Fiber to the home has been talked about for years,"
says Dagenais, "But I think it's finally coming."

Copyright Technology Review 2006.